Marine Omega-3s

Omega-3s are polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) found in humans, plants, and animals.1-3  Like polyphenols found in olives and olive oil, marine omega-3 fatty acids are a key component of the Mediterranean diet.4,5

Omega-3s are essential, meaning they must be acquired through foods or supplements because the body cannot make them on its own.1,2 Common natural sources of omega-3s include fatty fish (tuna, salmon, trout) and fish oil, shellfish (crab, mussels, oysters), flax and flaxseed oil, canola oil, legumes, and leafy vegetables.2,3,6

Omega-3 fatty acids are important for a number of functions in your body.Many organizations, including the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) along with the World Health Organization (WHO), recommend 250 mg/day of both EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) to maintain overall good health and prevent deficiency.7-9 The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends we eat 2 servings of fatty fish per week as a source of omega-3 fatty acids.10,11

Unfortunately, it can be very difficult for most people to get the recommended amount of omega-3s needed to reap the health benefits solely from the food they eat; supplementation may be necessary.2,3,11

Did You Know?

Symptoms of omega-3 deficiency include fatigue, poor memory, dry skin, heart problems, poor circulation, and mood swings or feelings of depression.12 The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) along with the World Health Organization (WHO) recommend 250 mg/day of both EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid).7,8

When taken for a week, PureVida™ delivers more omega-3s (EPA and DHA) than 3 fish meals on average. The American Heart Association recommends we eat 2 servings of fatty fish per week as a source of omega-3 fatty acids.11

Health Benefits of Omega-3s

Numerous studies have shown that consuming omega-3s may provide health benefits.13-18 Supportive but not conclusive research shows that consumption of EPA and DHA omega-3 fatty acids may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease.1-3,6,19,20

PureVida™ delivers marine omega-3s alongside olive polyphenols, so you can get several key components of the Mediterranean diet with just 1 supplement. Together with the other key ingredients in PureVida™, omega-3s have been shown, in a limited clinical trial conducted by OliVentures, to work to reduce CRP levels (a marker of inflammation in the blood) and joint pain in patients treated with aromatase inhibitors.a,*,21

Unleash the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant benefits of PureVida™. Just 2 softgels daily deliver the marine omega-3s, olive polyphenols, and curcuminoids you may need for better breast, joint, and heart health.*,21

Feel the Benefits of the PureVida Power of 3™

• Supports Heart, Breast, and Joint Health*

• Clinically evaluateda

• Formulation patent-pending

aIn a prospective, multicenter, pilot study of 45 postmenopausal women (mean age 59 years) with Stage 0-IIIA hormone receptor−positive breast cancer receiving stable doses of adjuvant aromatase inhibitor therapy for 2 to 5 years from their diagnosis, PureVida™ significantly reduced C-reactive protein (CRP) levels (p<0.05). In 45 patients examined for safety, reported adverse events (AEs) included abdominal pain in 1 patient (2.2%), constipation in 5 patients (11.1%), headache in 3 patients (6.7%), and abnormal product taste (fish taste) in 14 patients (31.1%). No patients had to discontinue therapy due to AEs. This study was conducted by OliVentures. There has been substantial separate research into the potential benefits of each of the ingredients in PureVida™. The PureVida™ trial has not been peer reviewed and more research is needed before drawing any final conclusions.

*This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Supportive but not conclusive research shows that consumption of EPA and DHA omega-3 fatty acids may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. Limited clinical evidence indicates that PureVida™ may lower elevated CRP levels. CRP is one of several markers of inflammation in the body. Limited clinical evidence indicates that PureVida™ may reduce joint pain in women taking aromatase inhibitors. These statements have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

  1. About omega-3 and fish oil. Omega-3 website. http://www.omega-3.se/en/fishoil.html. Updated Accessed April 10, 2017.
  2. Harper CR, Jacobson TA. Beyond the Mediterranean diet: the role of omega-3 fatty acids in the prevention of coronary heart disease. Prev Cardiol. 2003;6(3):136-146.
  3. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health. Omega-3 fatty acids. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health website. Available at: https://nccih.nih.gov/health/omega3. Updated July 12, 2016. Accessed April 10, 2017.
  4. Bach-Faig A, Berry EM, Lairon D, et al. Mediterranean diet pyramid today. Science and cultural updates. Public Health Nutr. 2011;14(12A):2274-2284.
  5. Mediterranean diet. Mayo Clinic website. http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/mediterranean-diet/art-20047801. Updated March 30, 2017. Accessed April 10, 2017.
  6. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health. Omega-3 supplements: in depth. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health website. Available at: https://nccih.nih.gov/health/omega3/introduction.htm. Updated August 2015. Accessed April 10, 2017.
  7. Interim summary of conclusions and dietary recommendations on total fat & fatty acids. World Health Organization website. http://www.who.int/nutrition/topics/FFA_summary_rec_conclusion.pdf?ua=1. Published 2008. Accessed June 20, 2017.
  8. Report of the Joint FAO/WHO expert consultation on the risks and benefits of fish consumption. Rome, 25-29 January 2010. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations website. http://www.fao.org/docrep/014/ba0136e/ba0136e00.pdf. Accessed July 11, 2017.
  9. 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. 8th edition. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion website. https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/resources/2015-2020_Dietary_Guidelines.pdf. Published December 2015. Accessed July 11, 2017.
  10. Kris-Etherton PM, Harris WS, Appel LJ, American Heart Association Nutrition Committee. Fish consumption, fish oil, omega-3 fatty acids, and cardiovascular disease. Circulation. 2002;106(21):2747-2757.
  11. Siscovick DS, Barringer TA, Fretts AM, et al. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (fish oil) supplementation and the prevention of clinical cardiovascular disease: a science advisory from the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2017;135(15):e867-e884.
  12. Omega-3 fatty acids. University of Maryland Medical Center website. http://www.umm.edu/Health/Medical/AltMed/Supplement/Omega-3-fatty-acid. Updated August 5, 2015. Accessed April 10, 2017.
  13. Munoz MA, Fito M, Marrugat J, et al. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with better mental and physical health. Br J Nutr. 2009;101(12):1821-1827.
  14. Trichopoulou A, Costacou T, Bamia C, Trichopoulos D. Adherence to a Mediterranean diet and survival in a Greek population. N Engl J Med. 2003;348(26):2599-2608.
  15. Tong TY, Wareham NJ, Khaw KT, Imamura F, Forouhi NG. Prospective association of the Mediterranean diet with cardiovascular disease incidence and mortality and its population impact in a non-Mediterranean population: the EPIC-Norfolk study. BMC Med. 2016;14(1):135.
  16. Perk J, De Backer G, Gohlke H, et al. European guidelines on cardiovascular disease prevention in clinical practice (version 2012). The Fifth Joint Task Force of the European Society of Cardiology and Other Societies on Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in Clinical Practice (constituted by representatives of nine societies and by invited experts). Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2012;19(4):585-667.
  17. Toledo E, Salas-Salvado J, Donat-Vargas C, et al. Mediterranean Diet and Invasive Breast Cancer Risk Among Women at High Cardiovascular Risk in the PREDIMED Trial: A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Intern Med. 2015;175(11):1752-1760.
  18. Bonaccio M, Di Castelnuovo A, Bonanni A, et al. Adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with a better health-related quality of life: a possible role of high dietary antioxidant content. BMJ Open. 2013;3(8).
  19. Swanson D, Block R, Mousa SA. Omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA: health benefits throughout life. Adv Nutr. 2012;3(1):1-7.
  20. Fabian CJ, Kimler BF, Hursting SD. Omega-3 fatty acids for breast cancer prevention and survivorship. Breast Cancer Res. 2015;17:62.
  21. Data on file. OliVentures, Inc. Raleigh, NC.